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Canon Paul Douthwaite
Parochial Administrator

WELCOME!

As the Parochial Administrator of Saint Patrick’s Church and Parish Community, I would like to extend a warm welcome to you. All that we do here as a parish community is about living the Gospel of Christ and proclaiming his Good News to those who come here and all whom we encounter through the ordinary lives we lead.

Our Church is a Welcoming Community, and we will be delighted for you to join us as you come to enter into the stillness and tranquillity of the church for worship or a moment of prayer. The website and our Twitter Feed allow you to enter into the life of the Community – albeit digitally and virtually – so as to connect you with the people who use this place regularly and find their sense of peace here, too. Just check on the opening times of the Church through the newsletter.

The website and Twitter posts are not, though, just about offering information; they are about keeping people in touch with the parish community and with one another. This time of COVID-19 has seen parish boundaries stretched not just across a city but across countries. It has been so good to welcome people back to Mass across the Season of Lent and heart-warming to see so many at the Easter Vigil.

Do come and visit. You’ll find the opening times of the church on the weekly newsletter and whilst they may be limited, the Church does offer you the chance to come into the presence of God and know that he is near. As things change week by week nationally, you’ll find we are open to enable you to find something of God’s peace and presence in this beautiful place.

May the God who seeks to reveal the immensity of his love for us remind each of us – always – that he is near.

Yours in Christ

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time                             22nd/23rd January 2022

First Reading Nehemiah 8:2-6,8-10
Ezra the priest brought the Law before the assembly, consisting of men, women, and children old enough to understand. This was the first day of the seventh month. On the square before the Water Gate, in the presence of the men and women, and children old enough to understand, he read from the book from early morning till noon; all the people listened atten-tively to the Book of the Law. Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden dais erected for the purpose. In full view of all the peo-ple – since he stood higher than all the people – Ezra opened the book; and when he opened it all the people stood up. Then Ezra blessed the Lord, the great God, and all the people raised their hands and answered, ‘Amen! Amen!’ Then they bowed down and, face to the ground, prostrated themselves before the Lord. And Ezra read from the Law of God, translating and giving the sense, so that the people understood what was read. Then Nehemiah – His Excellency – and Ezra, priest and scribe, and the Levites who were instructing the people, said to all the people, ‘This day is sacred to the Lord your God. Do not be mournful, do not weep.’ For the people were all in tears as they listened to the words of the Law. He then said, ‘Go, eat the fat, drink the sweet wine, and send a portion to the man who has nothing prepared ready. For this day is sacred to our Lord. Do not be sad: the joy of the Lord is your stronghold.’
Second Reading 1 Corinthians 12:12-30
Just as a human body, though it is made up of many parts, is a single unit because all these parts, though many, make one body, so it is with Christ. In the one Spirit we were all baptised, Jews as well as Greeks, slaves as well as citizens, and one Spirit was given to us all to drink. Nor is the body to be identified with any one of its many parts. If the foot were to say, ‘I am not a hand and so I do not belong to the body’, would that mean that it stopped being part of the body? If the ear were to say, ‘I am not an eye, and so I do not belong to the body’, would that mean that it was not a part of the body? If your whole body was just one eye, how would you hear anything? If it was just one ear, how would you smell anything? Instead of that, God put all the separate parts into the body on purpose. If all the parts were the same, how could it be a body? As it is, the parts are many but the body is one. The eye cannot say to the hand, ‘I do not need you’, nor can the head say to the feet, ‘I do not need you.’ What is more, it is precisely the parts of the body that seem to be the weakest which are the indispensable ones; and it is the least honourable parts of the body that we clothe with the greatest care. So our more improper parts get decorated in a way that our more proper parts do not need. God has arranged the body so that more dignity is given to the parts which are without it, and that there may not be disagreements inside the body, but that each part may be equally concerned for all the others. If one part is hurt, all parts are hurt with it. If one part is given special honour, all parts enjoy it. Now you together are Christ’s body; but each of you is a different part of it. In the Church, God has given the first place to apostles, the second to prophets, the third to teachers; after them, miracles, and after them the gift of healing; helpers, good leaders, those with many languages. Are all of them apostles, or all of them prophets, or all of them teachers? Do they all have the gift of miracles, or all have the gift of healing? Do all speak strange languages, and all interpret them?
Gospel Luke 1:1-4,4:14-21
Seeing that many others have undertaken to draw up accounts of the events that have taken place among us, exactly as these were handed down to us by those who from the outset were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word, I in my turn, after carefully going over the whole story from the beginning, have decided to write an ordered account for you, Theoph-ilus, so that your Excellency may learn how well founded the teaching is that you have received. Jesus, with the power of the Spirit in him, returned to Galilee; and his reputation spread throughout the countryside. He taught in their syna-gogues and everyone praised him. He came to Nazara, where he had been brought up, and went into the synagogue on the sabbath day as he usually did. He stood up to read and they handed him the scroll of the prophet Isaiah. Unrolling the scroll he found the place where it is written: The spirit of the Lord has been given to me, for he has anointed me. He has sent me to bring the good news to the poor, o proclaim liberty to captives and to the blind new sight, to set the downtrod-den free, o proclaim the Lord’s year of favour. He then rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the assistant and sat down. And all eyes in the synagogue were fixed on him. Then he began to speak to them, ‘This text is being fulfilled today even as you listen.’
 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 

Parish Weekly Diary:

Saturday 22nd January: (Vigil) Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, 4-4:30pm Sacrament of Reconciliation, 5:00pm Holy Mass.   

Sunday 23rd January: Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, No Mass

Monday 24th January: St Francis de Sales, No Mass 

Tuesday 25th January: Conversion of Saint Paul, 9:30am Holy Mass

Wednesday 26th January: Saints Timothy and Titus, 6:00pm Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, 6:30pm Holy Mass

Thursday 27th January: No Mass

Friday 28th January: St Thomas Aquinas, 9:30am Holy Mass

Saturday 29th January: Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, 4-4:30pm Sacrament of Reconciliation, 5:00pm Holy Mass.


All Welcome!